Diners can enjoy Recycle Utah’s annual 100 Mile Meal at home

0
33

Recycle Utah’s 100 Mile Meal will not take place at a private ranch in Oakley this year. Instead diners will be able to order meals in take-home kits. These kits will contain a five-course dinner and preparation instructions.
Park Record file photo | The Park Record

Recycle Utah supporters won’t have to travel far to enjoy this year’s 100 Mile Meal fundraiser.

Diners, instead of heading to a private ranch in Oakley like they have done the past five years, can enjoy the event in their own homes, due to the coronavirus pandemic, said Eric Moldenhauer, the nonprofit’s communications and development director.

“Even with COVID, we didn’t want to discontinue the 100 Mile Meal this year,” Moldenhauer said. “So we had to come up with a new plan.”

The plan calls for participants to order food kits online, pick them up and cook at home, he said.

Everything that is served during the meal comes from within a 100-mile radius of Recycle Utah’s location in Park City…” Eric Moldenhauer, Recycle Utah communications and development director

“The kits will have all the ingredients and recipes for an easy-to-prepare five-course dinner for a group of four,” Moldenhauer said. “So if you have eight people you want to dine with, you can order two boxes and so on.”

The kits will be prepared with the 100 Mile Meal concept in mind, he said.

“Everything that is served during the meal comes from within a 100-mile radius of Recycle Utah’s location in Park City,” he said. “All the produce and meat are grown and raised locally. And every farmer and producer we’re working with have donated all the ingredients.”

The menu, which is created by Park City Mountain Resort’s Executive Chef Alex Malmborg and prepared by him and chefs who work for restauranteur Bill White, will include vegetarian and vegan options as well, according to Moldenhauer.

“You can expect hors d’oeuvres, salad, sides, protein and dessert,” he said. “Chef Alex will provide step-by-step instructions so people who pick them up can make the meals.”

The meal kits, which are $300 each, will be distributed at the Corner Store at the Park City Mountain Resort Center, between noon on Friday, Aug. 14, and 4 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 15. Meals can also be delivered in a limited area for an extra cost.

“Once people put in an order, we will coordinate a pick-up or delivery time,” Moldenhauer said. “While the Corner Store is closed to the public, they are letting us use their kitchen. We will prep the kits there in sustainable packaging, because we want to create a zero-waste environment.”

The kits will come in an 18-gallon recycling tote and include four reusable cloth napkins made by Mountain Flower Apparel, some fresh local flowers cut from the garden of one of Recycle Utah’s board members and vases that were put into recycling, he said.

For an extra $100, the meal kits will come with a Bartender Box, created by Top Shelf, a local bartending service, Moldenhauer said.

“Top Shelf came out with a Bartender Box that includes everything you need, sans the alcohol, to create cocktails earlier this year, and they are making a custom box for the 100 Mile Meal as an add-on,” he said. “They came up with a carrot, ginger and lime cocktail kit. Up to eight cocktails can be made with either vodka or whiskey, which people need to purchase themselves.”

The Bartender Box will also come with four custom glasses that are made by board member Dana Peterson from recycled whiskey bottles, Moldenhauer said.

“The box is a little something we wanted to include because we usually have a bar at the 100 Mile Meal,” he said.

The 100 Mile Meal kits and optional Bartender Boxes can be ordered by visiting recycleutah.org.

“We are preparing 200 meals, which is 50 kits,” Moldenhauer said. “So we encourage people to order early, because once it sells out, that’s it.”

The 100 Mile Meal, sponsored by Vail Resorts’ EpicPromise program, Park City Mountain Resort and Gallery MAR, debuted five years ago to celebrate Recycle Utah and local farmers and vendors, Moldenhauer said.

“It’s a fundraiser for us, but more importantly, it shows what people can do with farm-to-table produce and meats,” he said. “By eating from within the Utah foodshed, we benefit our economy while reducing food miles.”



Original Source

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.