Ghost recycling groups

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Editor’s Note: Weekly New York and New Jersey Energy newsletter is a weekly version of POLITICO Pro’s daily New York and New Jersey Energy newsletter. POLITICO Pro is a policy intelligence platform that combines the news you need with tools you can use to take action on the day’s biggest stories. Act on the news with POLITICO Pro.

Welcome to the weekly version of POLITICO Pro’s daily New York and New Jersey Energy newsletter. POLITICO Pro is a policy intelligence platform that combines the news you need with tools you can use to take action on the day’s biggest stories. Act on the news with POLITICO Pro.

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GHOST RECYCLING GROUPS — POLITICO’s Samantha Maldonado: Two groups tasked with tackling New Jersey’s recycling and waste problems remain dormant and without members, in part due to inaction by the Murphy administration. Gov. Phil Murphy in January signed into law a bill to create a recycling market development council, but has yet to appoint anyone to it despite a March deadline to do so. The council is supposed to study bottlenecks in the recycling process and provide suggestions for overcoming related challenges. Under the law, the council is slated to issue a report on its findings by January 2021, but that seems all but impossible. Meanwhile, the 14-member Advisory Council on Solid Waste Management created within the Department of Environmental Protection in 1970 to improve solid waste management policy has been inactive for years. Members who were appointed previously have seen their terms expire.

Here’s what we’ll be watching this week:

MONDAY

— Congressman Frank Pallone (D-N.J.), local elected officials and a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers project manager hold a press conference on beach replenishment at 11 a.m. at the Long Beach Promenade.

— The NYISO holds a media briefing on a poll of support for carbon pricing, 1 p.m.

TUESDAY

— The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection holds a meeting on revamping its environmental laws to account for climate change, with a focus on industry, at 1 p.m.

— The Transportation and Climate Initiative states are trying to garner more support from influential environmental justice organizations, with a webinar focused on environmental justice and equity guardrails and strategies, 4 p.m.

WEDNESDAY

— Public hearings are held for National Grid’s upstate rate case, 1 p.m. and 6 p.m. Information here.

— FERC holds its technical conference on carbon pricing, which is of high interest to New York players pushing the concept, 9 a.m.

THURSDAY

— The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection holds a stakeholder meeting on revamping its environmental laws to account for climate change, with a focus on municipal officials at 10 a.m.

— Application for zero-emissions certificates are due to the Board of Public Utilities.

— Public hearings are held for National Grid’s upstate rate case, 1 p.m. and 6 p.m. Information here.

— New York’s Climate Justice Working Group meets, 2 p.m.

FRIDAY

— The New Jersey Board of Public Utilities holds a virtual board meeting.

GOOD MONDAY MORNING: Let us know if you have tips, story ideas or life advice. We’re always here at [email protected] and [email protected]. And if you like this letter, please tell a friend and/or loved one to sign up.

— The New Jersey legislature passed a piece of legislation that is the nation’s strictest, most far-reaching effort to tamp down on plastic use, and the first and only state-level prohibition on paper bags. It’s awaiting the governor’s signature.

— PSE&G reached an agreement with the Board of Public Utilities to implement a $1 billion, three-year suite of 10 energy efficiency programs to achieve reduced gas and electricity use.

— The BPU finalized requirements for building out the state’s electric vehicle charging infrastructure network.

New Jersey’s two remaining coal-fired power plants may shut down by the end of the year, but there’s disagreement on what that looks like and how the contracts would evolve.

— Newark is on the verge of stripping its water infrastructure of lead, more than a year after a public health crisis forced tens of thousands of city residents to rely on bottled water.

— Advisory panels for New York’s Climate Action Council continued to meet and discuss some top-line issues.

— NYPA’s board met and approved action to promote racial justice and equity internally at the authority and in its external dealings.

— Assemblyman Fred Thiele is proposing a measure to open up Long Island to community choice aggregation without the fee proposed by the Long Island Power Authority that would eliminate any savings.

— Adirondack groups are pressing Gov. Andrew Cuomo to sign a bill to create a pilot to limit road salt use.

— The state siting board rejected rehearing petitions from opponents of the Alle-Catt wind project.

— More New York residents are getting a license to hunt, with the pandemic appearing to drive some of the increase.

— Satellite imagery is being considered to help detect invasive pests in the Adirondacks after an infestation that could devastated the forests around Lake George was found to be older and more severe than hoped.

— The removal of the Hogansburg Dam from the St. Regis River has had little effect on formation of ice jams on the river, a study concluded.

— Upstate Republican lawmakers have proposed measures to limit fees for broadband access to Department of Transportation right-of-ways.

— NJ.com and Climate Central zoom into Newark to show how racist policies, in addition to climate change, led to heat islands in cities.

— A group funded by the billionaire who wants to expand his golf course on Liberty State Park says DEP’s plan to clean the park’s interior is lacking.

— About 20 kayakers paddled to the governor’s backyard to protest the Southern Reliability Link pipeline and demand a fossil fuel moratorium.

— OPINION: The New Jersey board chair of Clean Water Action pleas for state and local government to take action to consider and prevent future flooding.

— OPINION: Jeff Tittel connects the dots between the West Coast wildfires and what those conditions mean for New Jersey.

— OPINION: A reverend makes the case the faithful should vote for a candidate who will protect the earth.

— The DEP is suing an auto repair shop and dye house in Paterson for alleged environmental violations.

— American Water entered a $771 million contract to provide water and wastewater treatment services to 17 military bases around the country.

— Environmentalists praised the passage of the plastic and paper bag ban last week.

— New Jersey Institute of Technology is testing sewage to prevent a Covid-19 outbreak.



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